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Population Ecology

Language

English

Course format On-site
Date 2021-01-11 - 2021-05-07

The course presents modern population ecology as an interesting and dynamic field. Central in the course is to give an understanding of the abiotic and biotic ecological mechanisms that determine the distribution and abundances of populations in nature. The course introduces central theories within population ecology which include the importance of abiotic factors, competition, predation, herbivory, dispersal, diseases and harvesting strategies for fluctuations in population sizes. There will also be an introduction, including practical exercises, in how to estimate important population parameters related to demographic patterns and growth of populations.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge:

The student will:

  • have knowledge and understanding of theories about biotic and abiotic factors that influence the distribution and abundance of individuals in wild populations.
  • understand the significance of competition, predation, herbivory, dispersal, diseases and harvesting strategies for changes and fluctuations in population sizes.
  • have knowledge and understanding of methods that are applied to estimate important population parameters related to demography and population growth.

Skills:

The student can:

  • explain and reflect about central ecological theories and ecological mechanisms which influence the distribution and abundance of individual in populations.
  • apply different mathematical models that describe demographic properties in populations and estimate essential population parameters.

General competence:

The student has:

  • the ability to disseminate knowledge about central theories and reflect independently around important ecological mechanisms that influence changes and fluctuations in population sizes.

Prerequisites

Recommended previous knowledge

The course builds on BI 1003. In addition, the teaching builds on a basic knowledge of plant and animal taxonomy.

Files/Documents

ISCED Categories

Biology
Ecology